Martin Potůček

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Public Policy


Syllabus of the Course

Course title: PUBLIC POLICY

 

 

Course number: JSM518, Fall Semester 2017/18

Volume of instruction: 2/1

Number of credits: 9

Time and place: Mondays, 2-4:50 p.m., rooms 2080 (lectures), 2080, 2083, 3019 (seminars)

 

Lectures:

Course leader: Prof. Martin Potůček, PhD. http://www.martinpotucek.cz

Course and lectures website: http://www.martinpotucek.cz (slot Courses/Public Policy)

Consultations to be booked electronically at http://terms.fsv.cuni.cz

Syllabus Public Policy to download HERE(.pdf)

 

Syllabus of the Seminar

Course Title: PUBLIC POLICY – Seminar, Course Number: JSM518

Academic Year: 2017/2018, Fall Semester

Course webpage: http://www.martinpotucek.cz/vyuka_vp.html

Seminar materials: Moodle

Seminar class A’s language of instruction is English.

Head of seminar class A (Room J 3019): Mgr. Martina Štýbrová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript .

Note: Rokia Aidahis Aberra, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript , and Mgr. Silvie Pýchová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript will help Martina with her duties.

Seminar class C’s language of instruction is Czech.

Head of seminar class C (Room J 2083): Mgr. Kamila Vlčková, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (seminars, paper mentor)

Assistants:

Rokia Aidahis Aberra, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Věra-Karin Brázová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

PhDr. Ivan Duškov, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (seminar facilitator, paper mentor)

Steven Gawthorpe, M.PP., Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (seminar facilitator, paper mentor)

PhDr. Michaela Hiekischová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Jitka Hošťálková, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Mirna Jusic, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Jan Klusáček, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Richard Kokeš, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Petra Nováčková, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

PhDr. Ing. Petr Stehlík, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Martina Štýbrová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Lucie Trlifajová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Mgr. Eva Tušková, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (seminar facilitator, paper mentor)

Mgr. Petra Witzová, Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript (paper mentor)

Seminar Dates: 2 Oct, 9 Oct, 30 Oct, 6 Nov, 20 Nov, 4 Dec, 18 Dec

Time: 2-3:20 or 3:30–4:50 p.m.

Seminar Rooms: 2080 (English class), 2083 (English class), 3019 (Czech class)

Goals

This seminar is an integral part of the course on Public Policy. Its major goal is to complement lectures by giving a more in-depth knowledge in the students’ area of interest. Moreover, the seminars:

  • encourage practical interaction in small groups to elaborate on materials presented in lectures and on specific topics of practical experience and apply theoretical knowledge,
  • develop students’ presentation and argumentation skills,
  • enhance students’ skills of writing scientific texts and improve their analytical skills,
  • and also create possible opportunities for Masters students and doctoral level assistants to share experience by working together.

Structure of the Seminar

Active involvement of students is a major part of the learning process. For optimal communication with seminar assistants and paper mentors, to upload assignments and access reading materials using Moodle you need to enrol in Moodle at http://dl1.cuni.cz/enrol/index.php?id=1151 using your username and password for the Central Authentication Service of Charles University. If you do not have this information, please contact the university IT department. To ensure maximum interaction among students the entire class will be divided into 2 main classes, one English- and one Czech-speaking. Then each class will be divided into 2 or 3 groups to limit the number of students per seminar session. The seminar sessions for the first groups of both English- and Czech-speaking students take place between 2–3:20 p.m. in their respective classrooms. The seminar sessions for the second groups take place between 3:30–4:50 p.m., again in their respective classrooms (see above).

During the introductory session on October2, 2017, every student is expected to choose their respective class (English- or Czech-speaking) and the time of their preference (2–3:20 p.m. or 3:30–4:50 p.m.). Once registered, students can change neither their group nor their time of preference due to additional subdivisions and tasks assigned in the course of time. Students who wish to register for an additional seminar can do so with the approval of their seminar coordinators.

Each seminar group will be divided into four teams (A, B, C, D). This helps students to actively engage in their group assignments. During the first seminar session, the teams will be formed and the email contact of each team coordinator will be given to seminar facilitators.

Except the introductory session, first and the last seminar session, the rest respect the following structure:

· One team will always prepare a presentation on the topic (see below) and upload the PowerPoint presentation on Wednesday before the seminar week using Moodle.

· The second team will conduct a critical discussion with the authors of the presentation. This team needs to submit their critical comments on Wednesday right after the seminar day (Monday).

· Length of presentation: 25 minutes, length of critical discussion: 20 minutes, and the remaining time is always devoted to concluding remarks, discussion of seminar papers, organizational and technical matters.

· Distribution of activities of the four teams is as follow:

Date

Presentation

Critical discussion

2 Oct

Introduction of the course, formation of seminar groups

9 Oct

Introduction to the discipline. Agreement on presentation topics. Topics of final written assignments (discussion of choice of topics, recommended structure of papers, and basic rules of crediting sources).

30 Oct

A

D

6 Nov

B

C

20 Nov

C

B

4 Dec

D

A

Short Essay

Every student is required to write one short essay. The essay should not exceed 7200 characters including spaces. Please respect the following requirements for the essay.

  • Deadline: please upload in Moodle on or before 6 November.
  • The essay topic needs to be related to the policy process. You are first required to read your textbook (Fischer, F., Miller, G. J. and Sidney, M. S. 2007. Handbook of Public Policy Analysis: Theory, Politics, and Methods. New York: CRC Press.), part II, chapters 4–8. Your essay needs to demonstrate that you have read at least three of the five chapters.
  • You should apply theories of the policy process.
  • You can get a total of 6 points if the following criteria are met:

Understanding and correct application of the theories

2

Style and structure

2

Referencing

2

Seminar Content and Readings

Date

The seminar topic

Seminar Content

2 Oct

Introduction to the course, formation of seminar groups

9 Oct

Introduction to the seminar, agreement on presentations and distribution of assignments

Introduction to the discipline and seminar. Agreement on presentation topics. Topics of final written assignments (discussion of choice of topics, recommended structure of papers, and basic rules of crediting sources).

30 Oct

Market, State, and Civic Sector as Regulators

Presentations on general topic “Market, State and Civic Sector as Regulators”. Deadline for submitting final written assignment proposal (using the form at the end of this syllabus). Specifying the agreement on presentation topics. Discussion on proposal outline.

6 Nov

Actors and Institutions

Presentations on general topic “Actors and Institutions”. Submission of the short essay.

  • Potůček, M. et al. 2017. Public Policy. Prague, Karolinum Press, chapter A4. (In print. Available at Jinonice Library for in-house study.)
  • Schuyler House, R., Araral Jr., E. The institutional analysis and development framework. In: Araral Jr, E., Fritzen, S., Howlett, M., M Ramesh, Wu, X. (eds.) Routledge Handbook of Public Policy. New York: Routledge, 2013. Pp. 115–124.

20 Nov

Delimiting the Policy Problem

Presentations on general topic “Delimiting the Policy Problem”.

  • Hisschemöller, R., Hoppe, R. 2001. Coping with Intractable Controversies: The case for problem structuring in policy design and analysis. In Hisschemöller R., Hoppe, R., Dunn, W. N., Ravetz, J. Policy Studies Review Annual. Pp. 47–72.
  • Veselý, A. 2007. Problem delimitation in public policy analysis. Central European Journal of Public Policy, Vol. 1, pp. 80–101. Available at http://www.cejpp.eu/index.php/ojs/article/viewFile/11/7

4 Dec

Public Policies

Presentations on general topic “Public Policies”. Discussion on the elaboration of a comprehensive draft of the final assignment, which should be submitted to paper mentor on 11 December at latest.

  • Potůček, M. et al. 2017. Public Policy. Prague, Karolinum Press, chapter A5. (In print. Available at Jinonice Library for in-house study.)
  • Fawcett, H. 2006. Social Policy: Pensions. In: Peters, B. G., Pierre, J. (eds.): Handbook of Public Policy. London: Sage. Pp. 187–199.

18 Dec

Discussions on submitted drafts of final assignments. All paper mentors will be present.

Student Assessment

45% of the student’s evaluation (final grade) is based on his/her performance in the seminar. That is, the student’s activity during the seminar will be awarded a maximum of 20 points and the student can gain a maximum of 25 points for the final version of his/her submitted written assignment.

Points

Attendance

5

Critical discussion

2

Essay

6

PowerPoint presentation

7

Final written assignment

25

Total

45

Evaluation Criteria for PowerPoint Presentation and Critical Discussion

  • Clarity of presentation, precision of argument, ability to answer questions and defend the facts presented
  • Preparation and in-depth knowledge of the basic literature and general overview of the subject matter
  • PowerPoint presentation delivered by Wednesday evening.
  • Relevance of the critical evaluation
  • Leadership skills shown in the debates and critical discussions (courtesy, respect, humour)

How to implement a good PowerPoint presentation?

- Think about the structure of the presentation.

- Concentrate on getting a few simple points across.

- Keep the attention of the audience.

- Text in overheads should be large enough so that everyone can read them.

- If using a table, mark clearly the figure(s) you want the listeners to concentrate on.

- Too much animation can be distracting, so avoid animation overload.

- Handouts are generally a good idea; however, make sure that they do not deflect attention from your talk.

- The total duration of one presentation should not exceed 25 minutes.

- Never forget to speak slowly.

- Sum up your key arguments as bullet points in the conclusion.

How to prepare sound questions and lead a fine discussion?

- Do not do to others what you would not want to have done to you.

- Prepare the type of questions that you would like to receive yourself.

- Put forward open questions; avoid the possibility of simply answering yes or no.

- Concentrate your questions around key issues of the particular topic.

- In your answer, include comments aimed at alerting the audience to the wider implications of the issue discussed and boosting the debate.

- Be brief; do not occupy the majority of the debate yourself.

- Think positively; a critique of the opinion of others can wait until after they have presented their idea.

Evaluation Criteria for Seminar Papers (maximum 25 points)

· Submission of outline of work by 30 Oct (using the form, at the end of this syllabus) and draft by 11 Dec is mandatory. Students are obliged to pass the final paper directly to their mentors before the final examination. Paper mentors will confirm the acceptance of papers to students (via email or hand written). Students will show this printed or written confirmation to be allowed to enter the examination. The outline, draft and final version of the seminar paper needs to be submitted electronically via Moodle as well, as per the above schedule. After the evaluation of seminar papers, students can improve their work one more time and gain additional points.

· The seminar paper should fall within the range of 24,00 and 36,000 characters with spaces without attachments and bibliography. Students are obliged to update it otherwise.

· The study must meet the requirements of scientific text (language, style, citation, and work with sources (ISO 690 etc.), title, page numbering, formalities, rules, spelling

· Recommended structure:

o Cover page (title, author’s name and email, institution)

o Table of contents

o Summary

o Introduction

o Definition of cognitive or practical problems (where exactly the study will contribute to a better understanding, an introduction to more specialized issues, defining the problem, laying out the research questions, formulating the objectives of the study)

o Recapitulation of the current state of knowledge (formal sources with references)

o Theoretical background based on specific theoretical conceptualizations, etc.

o Outline of the methodology used (choice of procedure, limits, methods of application)

o Analytical procedure and results (e.g., specific problems, goals, actors, places of policy-making, tools, processes, existing public policy documents, the decisions taken, etc. associated with the topic)

o Conclusion (answer to the research question and the goal of the work, including critical evaluation of the results, recommendations for further direction of investigation)

o Bibliography and sources

o Appendices (optional)

Any form of plagiarism is unacceptable and will be dealt with using official procedures.

Basic sources in English

Potůček, M. et al. 2017. Public Policy. Prague, Karolinum Press. (In print. Available at Jinonice Library for in-house study.)

Howlett, M., Ramesh, M.: 2009. Studying Public Policy. Policy Cycles and Policy Subsystems. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Peters, Guy B.: 2015. Advanced Introduction to Public Policy. Northampton: Edwaard Elgar Publishing.

Potůček, M., LeLoup, L., Jenei, G. and Váradi, L. 2003. Public Policy in Central and Eastern Europe: Theories, Methods, Practices. Bratislava: NISPAcee. (Available at Jinonice Library for in-house study.)

Routledge Handbook of Public Policy. 2013. London and New York: Routledge

Základní literatura v češtině

Potůček, M. a kol. 2016. Veřejná politika. Praha: C. H. BECK.

Potůček, M. a kol. 2005 (2. vyd. 2010). Veřejná politika. Praha: Sociologické nakladatelství.

Veselý, A. and Nekola. M. (eds.) 2008. Analýza a tvorba veřejných politik: Přístupy, metody a praxe. Praha: Sociologické nakladatelství.

Topic of Seminar Paper

Student’s name: _________________________ Study Programme: __________________

Student’s suggestions:

Mentor’s Comments:

Approved version:

Title

Cognitive problem

Research question




Objective

Theory applied

Methods

Sources (literature, other sources)

Required and recommended reading (see course syllabus):

Electronic databases of scientific articles in the Jinonice Library (minimum one)

Required and recommended reading (see course syllabus):

Electronic databases of scientific articles in the Jinonice Library (minimum one)


Required and recommended reading (see course syllabus):

Electronic databases of scientific articles in the Jinonice Library (minimum one)

Date

Approved by mentor: ______________________________________________________

 

Download HERE (.docx)

 

 

 

Questions, Ouestions Answering Form

Question answering form, Public Policy course lectures 2017/18

 

Questions to lecture 2 (.pdf)

Questions to lecture 3 (.pdf)

Questions to lecture 4 (.pdf)

Questions to lecture 5 (.pdf)

 

Lectures - presentations

Intro 2018 - download HERE(.pdf)

L1 - download HERE(.pdf)

L2 - download HERE(.pdf)

L2, Case Study A Politicians and Experts - download HERE(.pdf)

L3 - download HERE(.pdf)

L3, Case Study Equivalence vs. Fiscal Discipline - download HERE(.pdf)

L4 - download HERE(.pdf)

L4, Case Study C Rivalry of Advocacy Coalitions - download HERE(.pdf)#mce_temp_url#

L5 - download HERE(.pdf)

L6 - download HERE(.pdf)

L7 - download HERE(.pdf)

 

Announcement on Students´Open Space Presentations

Public Policy course

ANNOUNCEMENT ON STUDENTS´ OPEN SPACE PRESENTATIONS

Students are invited to submit proposals for Open Space Presentations. They are scheduled in the course syllabus to be presented in Lesson 5 on November 27 and Lesson 6 on December 11.

Conditions for their approval by course leader:

- Presentation will identify a public policy problem, the way how it might be analyzed/solved. with public policy instruments and will refer to relevant sources.

- Both written and pwp presentation should be delivered to the course leader at least five days before the scheduled term to Tato emailová adresa je chráněna před spamboty, abyste ji viděli, povolte JavaScript .

- The time for oral presentation will be sharply limited to 15 minutes and for the discussion to 5, with the approval of the audience to additional 5 minutes.

Students who will successfully defend their presentation will get the premium of 20 points for their overall performance in lectures, irrespective of previous number of points gathered for lectures´ answers.

Martin Potůček

 
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